Rating: 4

Review: The Stone Light (Dark Reflections #2)

If you have read my review for the first book in this series, you know that it’s one of my all-time favourites. Of the three books, however, the second one is my least favourite – which still means that I enjoyed reading it a lot; it’s just not as magical as the first and not as shocking as the last of the original trilogy. So, what attribute does this one get? Well, it’s quite horrific! Not in writing or structure, characters or plot. It’s the themes and topics addressed that had me shuddering more than once. Remember I called the first book dark? Well, this one’s all ‘hold my Waters of Venice’ and literally goes to hell! And hell is not a cosy place …

Review: Fionas Fohlen (Pferdeheimat im Hochland, #3)

Welcome back to episode three of our favourite horsey highland soap opera! That may sound awfully cynical, but I really do love this series! We once again continue where we left of and focus on three major plotlines: the very soapy romance/family feud, the grumpy groom revelations, and the never-ending cruelty of mankind …

Review: Danny Boy (Pferdeheimat im Hochland, #2)

After finishing the first one, I immediately went on to book two. I had forgotten most about this series and was pleasently surprised how much I enjoy it! This second book is no exception here … however, the story gets a little darker …

Review: Schottischer Sommer (Pferdeheimat im Hochland, #1)

Fantastic premise, gorgeous setting, marvellous atmosphere, interesting characters – and no plot. Here’s why I nevertheless thoroughly enjoyed this reread (hints: Scotland! Run-down mansion! Horses! Politics being adressed!) …

Review: A Thousand Sisters

World War II is a piece of history that interests me a lot. I have watched numerous documentaries and like finding out more about stuff that went down back then. Being from Germany, my point of view courtesy of history lessons in school, documentaries, and the media has mostly been German-centric, so I really like taking on different points of view and exploring what happened in other countries. This book is one of those that provide insight into something I had never heard of thus far: I had no idea that Russia was the only country that allowed women to fly and become fighter pilots in the war. And what an incredible story they shared!

Review: The Scorpio Races

I can’t take this novel seriously. I’m sorry, I just can’t. Seeing all my friends raving about The Scorpio Races makes me laugh out loud. Don’t get me wrong. It’s not a bad novel, not at all. I enjoyed it immensely and had a lot of fun with it, some of it unintentional. Because it is, and there’s no way to sugar-coat it, a horse novel to a T. It’s so cliché, it can’t get any more cliché …

Review: Reiten bis zum Horizont

I’ve read about 600 horse novels so far, but except for the novelisation of Hidalgo (I love that film!) and a Mustang Mountain volume I more or less consider western riding, this is the first proper novel about endurance I ever read – at least as far as I remember. It’s a shame, really, because this makes for a rather interesting and hardly touched upon topic. I liked it so much I even gave the novel another star …

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