Wrap-Up August 2013

08th November 2013

WU 2013_08

[wptabs mode=“horizontal“][wptabtitle]English[/wptabtitle][wptabcontent]

Catching up on the posts I missed …

Even though my reading month of August ended a little early since I went on a short holiday on the 26th until the 3rd of September, I was able to improve my stats ginormeously. I increased the number of pages read and finished a smashing number of nine books. This makes August my third best reading month so far this year. Most surprisingly, I was able to fulfil my goal of reducing my TBR pile by two books this month. This is only the second time this year that I get a lottery ticket in the TBR reduction extreme challenge. I still can’t believe it for I went book shopping in both Munich and Berlin!

Finished

  1. The Earthsea Quartet (Earthsea, #1-4) by Ursula K. Le Guin

    Well, well, well. Finally, I’m done. I had started this book in May and read the first two novels back then because we discussed the second one in class. However, it took me a really long time to get through the other two novels.
    The Farthest Shore: I had a really hard time to get through this one. Although it started out quite interesting, it soon became extremely boring. It just wasn’t my cup of tea. 2/5
    Tehanu: I really liked the atmosphere and the setting and I enjoyed revisiting Tenar. I really liked her in the second volume and I was glad to get another novel from her perspective. I also liked the little girl Therru and her story. The only thing that bothered me was the last chapter. Not only did it feel rushed, it also seemed so out of place with the rather slow-paced rest of the novel. 3/5
    Of the four novels, The Tombs of Atuan is my favourite one. The atmosphere, the characters and the story were wonderful. In the end, I settled with the average of 3/5 for the whole novel.

Read

  1. Where She Went (If I Stay, #2) by Gayle Forman

    Many people dislike this volume and I can understand why. If I Stay was working perfectly as a standalone and had a proper ending. Now in this one, everything is different. Not only is the story told from Adam’s perspective, everything one thought was given after the first volume has changed dramatically. I, on the other hand, started out liking it much better than the first one. I felt that the whole premise was much more interesting and that the flashbacks were much better integrated into the story and didn’t feel like mini episodes; in other words, the awkward Lost feeling was gone. Unfortunately, the story was very predictable and although a tiny part of me wished for this ending, I neither wanted nor liked it, as crazy as it might sound. What happened was just the predictable and boring solution of an interesting situation. Therefore, I was a little disappointed. 3/5

  1. Der richtige Umgang mit Problempferden by Jo Bird
    [ET: Breaking Bad Habits in Horses]

    Good God, my edition had a terrible layout! Sometimes, letters were bold although they shouldn’t be, paragraphs were misplaced and once a sentence ended right in the middle and the rest was nowhere to be found. Besides, some of the pictures had rather poor captions. The book itself was interesting in some parts. I just thought it to be a little preposterous that virtually every stable vice could be cured by feeding more roughage. I’m not an expert, but I know horses with stable vices that have a different origin and cannot be cured by changing their fodder since that’s not what they’re lacking. So all in all, I expected it to give me some new and useful tips and trick which unfortunately was hardly the case. 2/5

  2. Vier Pferde kreuzten meinen Weg by Peer Werner Vogel
    [LT: Four Horses Crossed My Path]

    I read this one immediately after the one above and as opposed to the last one, this one is really, really good. I had some difficulties with the first chapter since it was all about a horse’s senses and perception. Don’t get me wrong, it was interesting and informative, I just couldn’t concentrate. However, I woke up as soon as the chapters on the problem horses started. They were just utterly perfect, illustrated with amazing photos. Mr Vogel beautifully describes his techniques to work with these four very different horses. It was amazing and, I have to admit, tear jerking, to read how much he was able to achieve in such a short time. For example, he was not only able to earn the trust of Malenka, a little traumatised mare, but to break her in (is there another term for this that doesn’t sound so cruel?) and go for a ride in just three days. There’s only one thing I have to criticise: I wish there would have been a couple of illustrations to clarify the positions these methods require in order to work. Although they were described in the text, I wasn’t able to reconstruct everything. 4/5

  3. Shadow and Bone (The Grisha, #1) by Leigh Bardugo

    Oh my, such a disappointment! The beginning was great and I got my hopes up, but the writing couldn’t keep up and soon everything lost its glamour, its enthralling mysteries and rugged beauty. I’m currently working on a proper review. 2/5

  4. The Darkest Minds (The Darkest Minds, #1) by Alexandra Bracken

    Wow, just wow. If I had to summarise this novel in one sentence, I’d say it’s X-men meets the Nazis – very dark, very disturbing and, even worse, very realistic. However, the pacing was a little slow at times and the story dragged a little and couldn’t draw me in completely. Review 4/5

  5. Silber: Das erste Buch der Träume (Silber-Trilogie, #1) by Kerstin Gier
    [Silver: The First Book of Dreams (Silver Trilogy, #1)]

    This novel saved my life. I was so nervous about something I had to do the next day that I was a total wreck and got nightmares and couldn’t sleep at all, but Silber helped me through the night. This funny fluffy read was able to make me laugh and distract me despite everything. I really truly loved the characters and for most parts, it was just hilarious to read how it all unfolds. I really love the idea of dreamwalking and the mysteries that come with it. There were some flaws (like the Gossip Girl thing – I have no idea why that’s in there) but I immensely enjoyed it. 5/5

  6. Sofies Welt by Jostein Gaarder [ET: Sophie’s World]

    Oh dear God, if I hadn’t read this novel together with Ric, I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t have finished it. I once started it a couple of years ago but put it aside after 140 pages. Perhaps I should have remembered this and learned from it, since I normally always finish a book. Well, the beginning seemed interesting enough but the farther we got, the more my thoughts started wandering off and I had a hard time to read the two chapters we had assigned each day. Sometimes I woke up in the middle of a chapter, not knowing what I had read the last couple of pages since my head had been entirely elsewhere. Furthermore, I didn’t really like Sofie. Her behaviour was very straining; one moment, she behaved like a ten-years-old, the next she lipped off her philosophy teacher. I don’t think I’ll read another novel by Mr. Gaarder anytime soon. 1/5

  7. The Witch of Duva (The Grisha, #0.5) by Leigh Bardugo

    After finishing Shadow and Bone, I went on to read this short story because I was told that it was much better than the novel and I had to get another book off my TBR pile anyway. Although it wasn’t able to blow me away, it was a really beautiful little piece and I liked it. There were some interesting twists and turns and the third person narration was very nice. It had a dreamy and ancient ring to it, just as a fairytale should have. I wished Shadow and Bone would have been written in third person too. That would have given it a little certain something that could have made all the difference. 3/5

Started

  1. The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling

    At first, I had some difficulties but I think I’m getting into the story. I’m a little confused by all these characters and have problems to keep them apart. There are just so many of them and everyone is connected somehow to everyone else. Nevertheless, I’m starting to like it. I’m pretty sure that it will make a great TV series.

  2. The Distant Hours by Kate Morton

    I love Kate Morton’s historical generation dramas very very much. This one also started out great. The main protagonist in the present is just like me although she’s a couple of years older. Then, there’s a long lost letter, a mother’s secret past, three extraordinary and strange sisters, a novel, and an old decaying castle. I’m really looking forward to solve all the puzzles and riddles and find the key to the past.

Stats

In Books
Planned Read Unplanned Sum
12 8
[started: 2]
1 9
  • first reads: 10
  • re-reads: 2
  • first reads: 8
  • re-reads: 0
  • first reads: 1
  • re-reads: 0
  • first reads: 9
  • re-reads: 0
In Pages
Planned Read Unplanned Sum
4475 2857 39 2896
[- 1579] 93 pages/day
322 pages/book

[/wptabcontent] [wptabtitle]Deutsch[/wptabtitle][wptabcontent]

Um mal ein paar Beiträge nachzuholen, die die ganze Zeit halbfertig rumlagen …

Obwohl mein Lesemonat August ein bisschen früher endete, da ich vom 26. August bis zum 3. September einen Kurzurlaub eingeschoben habe, konnte ich meine Statistik doch stark verbessern. Ich konnte die Zahl der gelesenen Seiten erhöhen und habe unglaubliche neun Bücher gelesen – was für mich schon ziemlich viel ist. Das macht August zu meinem bisherigen drittbesten Lesemonat. Überraschenderweise habe ich es sogar geschafft, mein Ziel für die SuB-Abbau-Extrem-Challenge zu erreichen und habe zwei Bücher abgebaut. Das ist jetzt erst das zweite Mal in diesem Jahr, dass ich ein Los bekommen habe. Ich kann es immer noch nicht glauben, wo ich doch zum Büchereinkaufen in München und Berlin war!

Beendet

  1. The Earthsea Quartet (Earthsea, #1-4) by Ursula K. Le Guin
    [dt. Erdsee (Erdsee, #1-4)]

    Na endlich! Ich hab es geschafft! Ich habe diesen Sammelband im Mai angefangen und die ersten beiden Bände damals gelesen, weil wir den zweiten im Seminar besprochen haben. Allerdings hat es dann unglaublich lange gedauert, bis ich die anderen zwei auch durchbekommen habe.
    The Farthest Shore (dt. Das ferne Ufer): Ich musste mich hier wirklich durchkämpfen. Obwohl es noch recht interessant angefangen hat, fand ich es bald extrem langweilig. Es war einfach nicht mein Fall. 2/5
    Tehanu (dt. Tehanu): Mir hat die Atmosphäre und der Handlungsort richtig gut gefallen und ich habe mich gefreut, Tenar nochmal zu begegnen. Ich habe sie im zweiten Band wirklich sehr gemocht und war froh, nochmal einen Roman aus ihrer Sicht zu bekommen. Ich mochte auch das kleine Mädchen Therru und ihre Geschichte. Das einzige, was mich wirklich gestört hat, war das letzte Kapitel. Ich fand es nicht nur viel zu übereilt, es schien auch nach dem ruhigen, eher langsamen Rest des Romans einfach total fehl am Platz zu sein. 3/5
    Von den vier Bänden hat mir The Tombs of Atuan (dt. Die Gräber von Atuan) am besten gefallen. Die Atmosphäre, die Charaktere und die Geschichte waren wunderbar. Am Ende habe ich mich für den Durchschnitt von 3/5 für den ganzen Sammelband entschieden.

Gelesen

  1. Where She Went (If I Stay, #2) by Gayle Forman
    [dt. Lovesong (Wenn ich bleibe, #2)]

    Viele mögen diesen Roman nicht und ich kann auch verstehen, warum. Wenn ich bleibe hat als Standalone ganz wunderbar funktioniert und hatte auch ein ordentliches Ende. Hier aber ist jetzt plötzlich alles ganz anders. Nicht nur wird die Geschichte aus Adams Perspektive erzählt, alles, was man nach dem ersten Band als gegeben angesehen hat, hat sich nun dramatisch verändert. Mir persönlich hat dieser Band am Anfang aber deutlich besser gefallen, als der erste. Ich fand die Ausgangssituation dieser Geschichte viel interessanter und die Flashbacks waren besser integriert und kamen nicht mehr wie Miniepisoden rüber. Das seltsame Lost-Feeling, das ich im ersten Teil noch hatte, war also weg. Leider war die Handlung dann aber doch sehr vorhersehbar und obwohl ein kleiner Teil von mir sich dieses Ende gewünscht hat, wollte ich es doch eigentlich gar nicht haben und fand es dann dementsprechend auch gar nicht gut, so verrückt das auch klingen mag. Es war einfach nur so vorhersehbar und die langweilige Lösung einer interessanten Situation. Deshalb war ich dann doch ein bisschen enttäuscht. 3/5

  1. Der richtige Umgang mit Problempferden by Jo Bird

    Großer Gott, meine Ausgabe hatte einfach ein furchtbares Layout! Manchmal waren Buchstaben fett gedruckt, obwohl sie es nicht hätten sein sollen, ganze Paragraphen waren am falschen Fleck und einmal hat ein Satz einfach in der Mitte aufgehört und der Rest war nicht aufzufinden. Daneben hatten ein paar Bilder ziemlich blöde Unterschriften. Das Buch selbst war teilweise interessant. Ich fand es allerdings ein bisschen absurd, dass quasi jede Stallunart dadurch beseitigt werden könne, in dem man mehr Raufutter zufüttert. Ich bin jetzt keine Expertin, aber ich kenne Pferde mit Stallunarten, die einen anderen Ursprung haben und nicht mit einer Futteränderung beseitigt werden können, da das nicht das Problem ist. Im Großen und Ganzen habe ich erwartet, dass es mir ein paar neue Tipps und Tricks verraten würde, was aber leider kaum der Fall war. 2/5

  2. Vier Pferde kreuzten meinen Weg by Peer Werner Vogel

    Ich habe dieses Buch direkt im Anschluss an das obere gelesen und im Gegensatz dazu ist es einfach nur richtig gut. Ich hatte nur ein paar Schwierigkeiten mit dem ersten Kapitel, da es hier ausschließlich um die Sinne und die Wahrnehmung eines Pferdes geht. Versteht mich nicht falsch, es war interessant und informativ, aber ich konnte mich nicht so ganz darauf konzentrieren. Allerdings bin ich aufgewacht, sobald die Kapitel über die Problempferde kamen. Diese waren einfach nur perfekt und mit fantastischen Fotos illustriert. Herr Vogel beschreibt seine Arbeitstechniken, die er bei diesen vier sehr unterschiedlichen Pferden anwendet, wirklich sehr gelungen. Es war einfach wunderbar zu lesen, wie viel er mit den Pferden in einer so kurzen Zeit erreicht hat und ich muss zugegeben, dass es mir auch schon mal die Tränchen in die Augen trieb. Er hat sich so z.B. nicht nur das Vertrauen der kleinen traumatisierten Stute Malenka verdient, sondern hat sie auch eingeritten und ist mit ihr sogar kurz ins Gelände gegangen – und das alles in nur drei Tagen! Es gibt nur eine Sache, die ich anzumerken habe: Ich wünschte, es hätte ein paar Illustrationen gegeben, um die Körperpositionen, die für diese Arbeit erforderlich sind, deutlicher zu machen. Obwohl sie alle im Text beschrieben waren, konnte ich nicht alles nachvollziehen. 4/5

  3. Shadow and Bone (The Grisha, #1) by Leigh Bardugo
    [dt. Goldene Flammen (Grischa, #1)]

    Oh Mann, so eine Enttäuschung! Der Anfang war fantastisch und ich hab mir schon große Hoffnungen gemacht, dass es ein neues Lieblingsbuch werden könnte. Leider konnte dann aber der Schreibstil einfach nicht mithalten und bald haben die spannenden Geheimnisse und die wilde Schönheit der Welt ihren Zauber verloren. Ich arbeite momentan an einer richtigen Rezension. 2/5

  4. The Darkest Minds (The Darkest Minds, #1) by Alexandra Bracken

    Wow, einfach nur wow. Wenn ich den Roman in einem Satz zusammenfassen müsste, würde ich sagen, dass es eine Mischung aus den X-men und den Nazis ist – sehr düster, sehr verstörend, und schlimmer noch, sehr realistisch. Allerdings war das Tempo manchmal zu langsam, weshalb die Geschichte hin und wieder ein bisschen langatmig war und mich deshalb nicht komplett überzeugen konnte. Rezension 4/5

  5. Silber: Das erste Buch der Träume (Silber-Trilogie, #1) by Kerstin Gier

    Silber hat mir das Leben gerettet – oder so. Ich war so nervös wegen etwas, das ich am nächsten Tag tun musste, dass ich einfach ein komplettes Wrack war, Albträume bekommen habe und im Endeffekt überhaupt nicht schlafen konnte. Der Roman hat mir dann aber geholfen, die Nacht zu überstehen. Diese lustige leichte Lektüre hat mich trotz allem zum Lachen gebracht und konnte mich ablenken. Ich liebe die Charaktere wirklich sehr und größtenteils war es einfach höchst amüsant zu lesen, wie sich alles entwickelte. Mir hat die Idee vom Traumwandeln und die ganzen Mysterien, die sich darum ranken, wirklich gut gefallen. Es gab ein paar Schwächen (wie z.B. diese Gossip-Girl-Sache – ich habe keine Ahnung, warum das dabei war), aber ich habe es trotzdem ungemein genossen. 5/5

  6. Sofies Welt by Jostein Gaarder

    Ach du lieber Gott, ich bin mir ziemlich sicher, dass ich den Roman nicht beendet hätte, wenn ich ihn nicht zusammen mit Ric gelesen hätte. Ich habe ihn schon einmal vor ein paar Jahren angefangen, nach 140 Seiten aber wieder weggelegt. Vielleicht hätte ich da mal dran denken und es mir eine Lehre sein lassen sollen, wo ich doch normalerweise immer alle Bücher beende, koste es, was es wolle. Nun denn, der Anfang schien gerade noch interessant genug zu sein, aber je weiter wir kamen, desto öfter sind meine Gedanken auf Wanderschaft gegangen und es ist mir ziemlich schwer gefallen, die zwei Kapitel pro Tag zu lesen. Manchmal bin ich mitten im Kapitel wieder aufgewacht ohne zu wissen, was ich auf den letzten paar Seiten eigentlich gelesen hatte, da mein Kopf einfach komplett woanders gewesen ist. Des Weiteren habe ich Sofie nicht sonderlich gemocht. Ihr Verhalten war ziemlich anstrengend zu ertragen; in einem Moment konnte man sie für eine Zehnjährige halten, im nächsten war sie rotzfrech zu ihren Philosophielehrer. Ich glaube nicht, dass ich in absehbarer Zeit einen weiteren Roman von Herrn Gaarder lesen werde. 1/5

  7. The Witch of Duva (The Grisha, #0.5) by Leigh Bardugo
    [dt. Die Hexe von Duwa]

    Nachdem ich Shadow and Bone fertig gelesen hatte, habe ich gleich mit dieser Kurzgeschichte weitergemacht, da mir gesagt wurde, dass sie so viel besser sei als der Roman. Außerdem musste ich sowieso noch ganz schnell ein Buch von meinem SuB bekommen. Obwohl es mich jetzt nicht umgehauen hat, war es doch eine sehr schöne Kurzgeschichte. Es gibt ein paar sehr interessante Wendungen und die Erzählung in der dritten Person hat mir wirklich gut gefallen. Das hat einfach eine so verträumte und altertümliche Atmosphäre heraufbeschworen, ganz so, wie sie ein Märchen haben sollte. Ich wünschte, Shadow and Bone wäre auch in der dritten Person geschrieben worden. Das hätte ihm vielleicht dieses gewisse Etwas gegeben, das viel hätte ausmachen können. 3/5

Started

  1. The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling
    [dt. Ein plötzlicher Todesfall]

    Zuerst hatte ich ein paar Schwierigkeiten, aber so langsam komme ich in die Geschichte. Allerdings verwirren mich die ganzen Charaktere und ich habe Probleme, sie alle auseinanderzuhalten. Es sind einfach so viele und jeder ist irgendwie mit jedem auf irgendeine Weise verbunden. Trotzdem fange ich so langsam an, es zu mögen. Ich bin mir ziemlich sicher, dass es eine super Fernsehserie abgeben wird.

  2. The Distant Hours von Kate Morton
    [dt. Die fernen Stunden]

    Ich liebe Kate Mortons historische Generationsdramen. Dieses hier hat auch schon mal super angefangen. Die Protagonistin in der Gegenwart ist irgendwie genau wie ich, wenn auch ein paar Jahre älter. Dann wären da noch ein lange verloren geglaubter Brief, die geheimnisvolle Vergangenheit einer Mutter, drei ganz spezielle und skurrile Schwestern, ein Roman, und ein altes, verfallendes Schloss. Ich freu mich schon darauf, all die Puzzle und Rätsel zu lösen und den Schlüssel zur Vergangenheit zu finden.

Statistik

In Büchern
Geplant Gelesen Ungeplant Summe
12 8
[angefangen: 2]
1 9
  • First-Reads: 10
  • Rereads: 2
  • First-Reads: 8
  • Rereads: 0
  • First-Reads: 1
  • Rereads: 0
  • First-Reads: 9
  • Rereads: 0
In Seiten
Geplant Gelesen Ungeplant Summe
4475 2857 39 2896
[- 1579] 93 Seiten/Tag
322 Seiten/Buch

[/wptabcontent][/wptabs]

Share with:

Leave a reply